“The Accuser” April 15

 

The Accuser - Satan, the accuser of the brethren, seldom rests. He accuses us about the past. He accuses us about the present. He accuses us about our future. He'll even accuse when it comes to serving God, reading the Bible, praying or anything else we do for God.Satan, the accuser of the brethren, seldom rests. He accuses us about the past. He accuses us about the present. He accuses us about our future. He’ll even accuse us when it comes to serving God, reading the Bible, praying or anything else we do for God. Is there any refuge from his accusations?

 

Today’s Readings:
Joshua 19 & 20
Psalm 46.1-6
Proverbs 14.7-11
Luke 12.32-59

 

The Accuser

 

Joshua 19 & 20:

Cities of Refuge

 

Chapter 20 talks about the cities of refuge where someone accused of murder or manslaughter could run for safety until a judge could decide his or her fate. Otherwise their accuser might decide to take justice into his own hands.

Our next reading, Psalm 46, reminds us that God Himself is our Refuge from Satan, our accuser (Rev. 12.10). Revelation 12 tells us that he accuses us day and night, sometimes in the throne room of God, as he did with Job. He accuses us about the past. He accuses us about the present. He accuses us about our future. He’ll even accuse us about serving God, reading the Bible, praying or anything else we do for God by telling us that our efforts are inadequate or what we have done in the past is too bad and God will never use us.

 

Our Advocate

 

Either way, we have an Advocate. 1 John 1.7-9, 2.1-2:

7 But if we walk in the light as He is in the light, we have fellowship with one another, and the blood of Jesus Christ His Son cleanses us from all sin. 8 If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. 9 If we confess our sins, He is faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.

1 My little children, these things I write to you, so that you may not sin. And if anyone sins, we have an Advocate with the Father, Jesus Christ the righteous. 2 And He Himself is the propitiation for our sins, and not for ours only but also for the whole world.

And Hebrews 7.25 says, “… He always lives to make intercession for us.”

If we have been regenerated, born again by the Spirit of God, then Christ has paid the price for our sins and Jesus, our Divine Attorney, is our Defender.

 

TODAY’S OTHER READINGS:

 

Psalm 46.1-6:

God is our Refuge

 

This beautiful psalm should remind us from where true peace and stability come. The answer is not from government; even the greatest can fail. It’s not in our finances or our intelligence or anything else on earth. Only God is the “refuge and strength” that will never fail. If we fear God, we don’t need to fear anything else!  Continue reading

“Why bother living right?” August 4

 

Why bother living right? - If God is willing to forgive sin, why not just live any way we want and confess it later? Why bother living right?If God is willing to forgive sin, why not just live any way we want and confess it later? Why bother living right?

 

Today’s Readings:
Esther 9 & 10
Psalm 91.1-6
Proverbs 22.12
Romans 6

 

Why bother living right?

 

Romans 6:

Shall we continue to sin?

 

Paul has been explaining how we’re saved by grace and kept by grace rather than any “good works” of our own. Though we could do nothing to save ourselves and no amount of good works will cause God to love us more, it doesn’t mean we should live any way we want.

Chapter 6 begins:

“What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin that grace may abound? Certainly not! How shall we who died to sin live any longer in it?” (vv. 1-2).

Our obedience shouldn’t come from some feeble attempt to stay in God’s good graces. It should come from our love and gratitude for all He has done.

Maybe you’re thinking, why not just live the way we want since God saves by grace and forgives sin?

God’s saving grace is available to all who call on Him in faith and sincerity (Rom. 10.13), but when He saves us, He also changes us. 2 Corinthians 5.17:

Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he is a new creation; old things have passed away; behold, all things have become new.

So while our good works can’t save us and God will forgive the genuinely repentant, our good works are the evidence of a changed life and our lack of desire to live righteously is often evidence of an unredeemed life.

“Not everyone who says to Me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ shall enter the kingdom of heaven, but he who does the will of My Father in heaven. Many will say to Me in that day, ‘Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in Your name, cast out demons in Your name, and done many wonders in Your name?’ And then I will declare to them, ‘I never knew you; depart from Me, you who practice lawlessness!’ ” (Matt. 7.21-23).

Many will say …” There are many people in the church doing “religious” things who don’t have a genuine relationship with Christ. They may give intellectual assent to the truths of Scripture, but they have failed to see their sinful state and need for a Savior. They have never really put their faith and trust in His finished work on the cross which is the only basis for entry into the kingdom of heaven.

So while they may go to church and say the right things about what they believe, the fruit of their lives on a day to day basis is often not the fruit of a changed life.


Today’s Other Readings:

 

Esther 9 & 10:

God’s Word Will Stand

 

So we come to the end of the book of Esther and our glimpse into the lives of the Jewish people still living in exile. This conflict between Haman and Mordecai actually reached back to the time of the Israelites’ exodus from Egypt when the ancestors of Haman attacked the Israelites. God had declared a curse on them which included their total annihilation. Continue reading

May 6 “Is it godly sorrow or worldly sorrow?”

Is it godly sorrow or worldly sorrow? Worldly sorrow can lead to disqualification as it did with Saul and others, but godly sorrow leads to repentance and a changed life.

Godly sorrow or worldly sorrow

Today’s Readings:
1 Samuel 14 & 15
Psalm 57.1-3
Proverbs 15.24-25
Luke 23.1-25

1 Samuel 14 & 15:

Downhill fast

Things are going downhill fast for Saul. God had judged the Amalekites for years of sin and idolatry. It was also another opportunity for Saul to demonstrate his obedience to God. Instead of taking God at His Word, Saul decided to do what seemed right to him.

After disobeying God’s direct command, notice how he greeted Samuel, “Then Samuel went to Saul, and Saul said to him, ‘Blessed are you of the LORD! I have performed the commandment of the LORD'” (v. 13). Because he had obeyed part of what God said, he thought that was good enough! And notice, the first thing Saul did after his victory, was to set up a monument for himself (v. 12).

Proverbs tells us that every man will proclaim his own goodness, “Every way of a man is right in his own eyes, but the LORD weighs the hearts (Prov. 21.2). The Lord weighs the hearts. God knows our motives and He knew Saul’s, too.

And when he was confronted by Samuel for his disobedience, he immediately got on the blameshifting wagon! First he blamed the people (v. 21), then he tried to say he took the forbidden spoil so he could sacrifice it to God (v. 21). And when he realized Samuel wasn’t buying it, instead of repenting, he only wanted to save face with the people, “Then he said, ‘I have sinned; yet honor me now, please, before the elders of my people and before Israel, and return with me, that I may worship the LORD your God'” (v. 30).

Godly sorrow or worldly sorrow?

The question for us is how will we respond when we blow it? With brokenness because we realize we’ve sinned against a righteous and holy God? Or with worldly sorrow?

Godly sorrow or worldly sorrow

Worldly sorrow is sorry for the consequences that often result, but godly sorrow brings genuine repentance. It brings a change of attitude which results in a change of behavior.

Worldly sorrow causes us to want to save face like Saul and avoid the consequences. Genuine repentance is less concerned with the consequences and, instead, concerned with God’s glory. Let’s cultivate a hatred of our own sin and a willingness to truly repent over our sins. Continue reading

April 15 “Our Divine Attorney”

Satan, the accuser of the brethren, seldom rests. He accuses us about the past. He accuses us about the present. He accuses us about our future. He’ll even accuse us about reading the Bible.

divine attorney

But if we have been regenerated, born again by the Spirit of God, then Christ has paid the price for our sins and we have Jesus as our Divine Attorney.

And if you’re not sure that describes you, the Good News is … you can be (Rom. 6.23, 10.9-10, 13; 1 Jn. 5.13)!

And if he’s accusing you about falling behind or missing some days in your Bible reading … or if you’ve just joined us, simply start with today. All Scripture is profitable, no matter where you start (2 Tim. 3.16).

Today’s Readings:
Joshua 19 & 20
Psalm 46.1-6
Proverbs 14.7-11
Luke 12.32-59

Joshua 19 & 20:

Cities of Refuge

Chapter 20 talks about the cities of refuge where someone accused of murder or manslaughter could run for safety until a judge could decide their fate. Otherwise their accuser might decide to take justice into his own hands.

Our next reading, Psalm 46, reminds us that God Himself is our Refuge from Satan, our accuser (Rev. 12.10). Revelation 12 tells us that he accuses us day and night, sometimes in the throne room of God, as he did with Job, and sometimes he’s that unrelenting voice in our own minds. Continue reading