“Pride … Me?” July 15

 

Pride ... Me? - Stuart Scott says, "Pride is the opposite of humility and it is one of the most loathed sins in God's sight" (Prov. 16.5). He adds, "We all have pride ... The question is not 'Do I have it?' but, 'Where is it?' and 'How much of it do I have?'” So where does pride show up in your life?Stuart Scott says, “Pride is the opposite of humility and it is one of the most loathed sins in God’s sight” (Prov. 16.5). He adds, “We all have pride … The question is not ‘Do I have it?’ but, ‘Where is it?’ and ‘How much of it do I have?’” So where does pride show up in your life?

 

Today’s Readings:
2 Chronicles 25-27
Psalm 84.1-7
Proverbs 21.4-5
Acts 19.1-20

 

Pride … Me?

 

Proverbs 21.4-5:

A PROUD HEART

 

Verse 4, “A haughty look, a proud heart, and the plowing of the wicked are sin.”

Over and over the Bible warns against the dangers of pride.

Stuart Scott in his powerful little booklet From Pride to Humility says:

“It is probably safe to say that humility is the one character quality that will enable us to be all Christ wants us to be. We cannot come to God without it. We cannot love God supremely without it.”

He goes on to say we can’t be an effective witness, love and serve others, lead, communicate properly, or resist sin without it (Eph. 4.1-2).

“You cannot have humility where pride exists. Pride is the opposite of humility and it is one of the most loathed sins in God’s sight” (Prov. 16.5). He adds, “We all have pride, each and every one of us. The question is not ‘Do I have it?’ but, ‘Where is it?’ and ‘How much of it do I have?’”

He lists some of the manifestations of pride as:

1. Complaining against or passing judgment on God.
2. A lack of gratitude in general.
3. Anger.
4. Seeing yourself as better than others.
5. Having an inflated view of your importance, gifts, and abilities.
6. Being focused on your lack of gifts and abilities.
7. Perfectionism.
8. Talking too much.
9. Talking too much about yourself.
10. Seeking independence or control.
11. Being consumed by what others think.
12. Being devastated or angered by criticism.
13. Being unteachable.
14. Being sarcastic, hurtful, or degrading.
15. A lack of service.
16. A lack of compassion.
17. Being defensive or blame-shifting.
18. A lack of admitting when you are wrong.
19. A lack of asking forgiveness.
20. A lack of biblical prayer.
21. Resisting authority or being disrespectful.
22. Voicing preferences or opinions when not asked.
23. Minimizing you own sin and shortcomings.
24. Maximizing others’ sin and shortcomings.
25. Being impatient or irritable with others.
26. Being jealous or envious.
27. Using others.
28. Being deceitful by covering up sins, faults, and mistakes.
29. Using attention-getting tactics.
30. Not having close relationships.

Some of those may have surprised you, as pride can be very subtle, masquerading as something else.

Today’s reading in 2 Chronicles gives us a great illustration of what pride can do …  Continue reading

“Exhaustion, Disappointment, & Discouragement” June 5

 

exhaustion

Could exhaustion, disappointment, or neglect of your time in the Word be the cause of discouragement or depression?

 

Today’s Readings:
1 Kings 19 & 20
Psalm 70.1-5
Proverbs 18.1-2
John 14.1-31

 

1 Kings 19 & 20:

Exhaustion, disappointment & discouragement

I always find it amazing that after defeating the prophets of Baal and seeing God do such a mighty work, Elijah would respond the way he did to Jezebel’s threat (chap. 19). But it’s a good reminder to us that when we get exhausted, physically and/or spiritually, things often seem much worse than they are, because we can easily get our eyes off God and on to our own strength or the lack of it.

As John MacArthur pointed out in his Daily Bible, he probably expected Ahab and Jezebel to repent after that great display of God’s power and when they didn’t, he became discouraged.

 

Elijah’s disappointment over their lack of repentance and his own physical and spiritual exhaustion led to discouragement and depression (in verse 19.3 he asked God to take his life). Instead God gave him what he, actually, needed. Continue reading

July 15 “Pride … me?”

pride

Stuart Scott says, “Pride is the opposite of humility and it is one of the most loathed sins in God’s sight” (Prov. 16.5). He adds, “We all have pride … The question is not ‘Do I have it?’ but, ‘Where is it?’ and ‘How much of it do I have?’”

Today’s Readings:
2 Chronicles 25-27
Psalm 84.1-7
Proverbs 21.4-5
Acts 19.1-20

2 Chronicles 25-27:

His heart was lifted up to his destruction

In chapter 26 we read about Uzziah who, “did what was right in the sight of the Lord …” (v. 4) and “… as long as he sought the Lord, God made him prosper” (v. 5) “But when he was strong his heart was lifted up, to his destruction …” (v. 6).

The rest of the story reveals a king who thought he was above God’s law. He went into the temple and burned incense in the priest’s place. And even when he was confronted by Azariah and 80 other priests, he refused to heed God’s commands. Verses 19-20:

19 Then Uzziah became furious; and he had a censer in his hand to burn incense. And while he was angry with the priests, leprosy broke out on his forehead, before the priests in the house of the LORD, beside the incense altar. 20 And Azariah the chief priest and all the priests looked at him, and there, on his forehead, he was leprous; so they thrust him out of that place. Indeed he also hurried to get out, because the LORD had struck him.

God is a God of patience and mercy, but He does eventually judge sin. He showed mercy to Uzziah by sending His priests to confront him. But when he refused to listen to their godly rebuke, God dealt with him. Continue reading

June 23 “One way to peace & hope” & LINKUP

What do you rely on for peace today? Where is your hope for the future? There is only one way to have both.

one way

Today’s Readings:
1 Chronicles 9 & 10
Psalm 77.10-15
Proverbs 19.15-16
Acts 6.1-15

1 Chronicles 9 & 10:

Failure to trust in the sovereignty of God

If you think of the Bible as being written chronologically, today’s reading and much of what follows may seem confusing. But the Bible is not put together chronologically, as far as the various books go. And at times, as in Chronicles, it repeats things that were previously recorded with a slightly different perspective.

It may help to remember that Chronicles was probably written by Ezra. He was a priest who came back to Jerusalem after they had been in Babylonian captivity for 70 years. So he was writing from the perspective of the return and how life was so dramatically different from how it was during the reigns of David and Solomon. This portion covers the genealogy of the people who were returning and emphasizes the reign of David.

The last two verses of chapter 10 are worth meditating on:

Continue reading