“When You Feel Beaten & Bruised” December 27

 

When You Feel Beaten & Bruised - Do you feel beaten and bruised from raising a strong-willed child or by being in a difficult marriage? Have you recently faced a devastating loss or were the holidays especially difficult? How do you keep going when life seems to be full of challenges? Not in your own strength, but … #tests #trials #hardship #faith #christian #tribulation #falsereligionDo you feel beaten and bruised from raising a strong-willed child or by being in a difficult marriage? Have you recently faced a devastating loss or were the holidays especially difficult? How do you keep going when life seems full of challenges? Not in your own strength, but …  Continue reading

“Wade in Deeper into God’s Word” November 28

 

Wade In Deeper into God's Word - The river flowing out of the Millennial Temple represents the fullness of Scripture. Some things are “ankle deep”—easy to understand. Others are knee deep and require more study. Others are deeper still and we may not be able to understand them fully. Even so, God wants us to "wade in" so we can grow in our understanding of Him and His Word. Also, read about "The 4 Attitudes to have in the Midst of Trials & Persecution" and "The Futility of Arguing with a Fool." The river flowing out of the Millennial Temple represents the fullness of Scripture. Some things are “ankle deep”—easy to understand. Others are “knee deep” and require more study. Others are deeper still and we may not be able to understand them fully. Even so, God wants us to “wade in” so we can grow in our understanding of Him and His Word.

Also, read about “The 4 Attitudes to have in the Midst of Trials & Persecution” and “The Futility of Arguing with a Fool.”  Continue reading

“Are You Profiting from the Bible?” November 25

 

Are you "profiting" from the Bible?

Are you getting the most benefit from your hearing, reading, and study of God’s Word? What does Matthew Henry mean when he talks about “profiting from the Bible”? And what might prevent us from doing so?

Also, what did Peter have to say to suffering Christians in the first century that flies in the face of our “don’t-step-on-my-toes-I-have-rights” generation?  Continue reading

“Is the Devil about to REEL You In?” November 23

 

Could the devil be about to reel you in? Could you be nibbling on some bait that he has designed just for you? God has clearly explained just how that happens so we can avoid being ensnared by his bait. But would you recognize it, if it was happening to you? Could the devil be about to reel you in? Could you be nibbling on some bait that he has designed just for you? God has clearly explained just how that happens so we can avoid being ensnared by his bait. But would you recognize it, if it was happening to you?  Continue reading

“Where is God When Life is Hard?” November 18

 

Where is God When Life is Hard? - Where is God when life is hard? Does He allow tests and trials in our lives because He is angry? How should we respond to His discipline and what are the dangers of rejecting it? Also, what is the one character quality that will enable us to be all Christ wants us to be, the one without which we cannot come to God or love Him the way we should? It's the same quality required to love and serve others, lead in a godly way, communicate biblically, resolve conflict, deal with the sins of others, and resist sin ourselves.Where is God when life is hard? Does He allow tests and trials in our lives because He is angry? How should we respond to His discipline and what are the dangers of rejecting it?

Also, what is the one character quality that will enable us to be all Christ wants us to be, the one without which we cannot come to God or love Him the way we should? It’s the same quality required to love and serve others, lead in a godly way, communicate biblically, resolve conflict, deal with the sins of others, and resist sin ourselves.  Continue reading

“Words & Attitudes Matter!” October 19

 

Words & Attitudes Matter - Words and attitudes matter! Whether we’re nagging or encouraging, praising or criticizing, they matter. They matter in our relationships with the people in our lives. Words and attitudes also matter in our relationship with God. Will we be patient and faithful in times of tribulation, as well as blessing, or will our praise quickly turn to anger and bitterness? And if we realize our words and attitudes need to change, where do we start?Words and attitudes matter! Whether we’re nagging or encouraging, praising or criticizing, they matter. They matter in our relationships with the people in our lives.

Words and attitudes also matter in our relationship with God. Will we be patient and faithful in times of tribulation, as well as blessing, or will our praise quickly turn to anger and bitterness?

And if we realize our words and attitudes need to change, where do we start?  Continue reading

“Good Doctrine Matters” September 12

 

Good Doctrine Matters - Good doctrine ... there I said it ... the "D" word. It seems like, in many churches, we're afraid of the word and of calling other biblical concepts by their traditional or biblical names. I understand the value of making preaching and teaching relevant. But have we gone to such lengths to avoid using biblical terminology that we're at risk of producing a generation of biblical illiterates?Good doctrine … there I said it … the “D” word. It seems, in many churches, we’re afraid of the word and of calling other biblical concepts by their traditional or biblical names. I understand the value of making preaching and teaching relevant. But have we gone to such lengths to avoid using biblical terminology that we’re at risk of producing a generation of biblical illiterates?

According to Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary, doctrine is, “a set of ideas or beliefs that are taught or believed to be true.” Biblical doctrine is made up of the ideas and beliefs that the Bible teaches to be true. It’s the Bible carefully studied and understood.

Good doctrine matters because what we believe about God, His sovereignty, and His dealings with those He loves, determines how we’ll respond to the tests and trials of life among other things. It also determines whether we witness, how we interact with others, especially our spouses and children, and whether we have peace at the end of our lives. Good doctrine matters more than we know.

 

Today’s Readings:
Isaiah 15 & 16
Psalm 106.24-31
Proverbs 25.8-10
2 Corinthians 4.1-18

 

Good Doctrine Matters!

 

2 Corinthians 4.1-18:

Good Doctrine Concerning Tests & Trials

 

One area where good doctrine is vitally important concerns the tests and trials we experience in life, like the people whose lives have been affected by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, as my husband talked about in his sermon, a couple of Sundays ago.

Look at what Paul had to say about his own in verses 1, 7-10:

1 Therefore, since we have this ministry, as we have received mercy, we do not lose heart:

7 But we have this treasure in earthen vessels, that the excellence of the power may be of God and not of us. 8 We are hard-pressed on every side, yet not crushed; we are perplexed, but not in despair; 9 persecuted, but not forsaken; struck down, but not destroyed— 10 always carrying about in the body the dying of the Lord Jesus, that the life of Jesus also may be manifested in our body.

Many today come to God with a what-can-He do-for-me attitude. That attitude is fed by the popular “health and prosperity doctrine.” It’s a doctrine with great appeal, but it has a nasty downside.

What if you believe God will give you whatever you desire if you just have enough faith?

What if you believe God always wants His children healed physically, guarantees that our children will grow up to serve Him, and gives us freedom from all hardship?

Then … what if … God doesn’t make you rich or heal your body? What if your child gets sick? What if you continue to struggle financially? What if your husband doesn’t get saved or come back home or never changes? What if the man of your dreams doesn’t appear? What if you suffer physically? What if your children rebel?  Continue reading

“The Danger in NOT Judging Sin” August 23

 

The Danger in NOT Judging Sin - While we cannot know another person’s heart, it is a misunderstanding of the Bible to think we are never to judge someone else's behavior. In fact, there is great danger in not judging sin, especially to the person caught up in it.While we cannot know another person’s heart, it is a misunderstanding of the Bible to think we are never to judge someone else’s behavior. In fact, there is great danger in not judging sin, especially to the person caught up in it.

Also read about some things to consider when going through a test or a trial and some of the traps that can lead to sexual immorality.

 

Today’s Readings:
Job 37 & 38
Psalm 100.1-5
Proverbs 23.26-28
1 Corinthians 5.1-13

 

The Danger in NOT Judging Sin

 

1 Corinthians 5.1-13:

For the Purpose of Reconciliation

 

Our reading in Proverbs today has some strong warnings about the dangers of sexual immorality. The Corinthian church had their problems in this area and, instead of dealing with it biblically, they chose to look the other way. In our society today, we might call this “being tolerant”!

Sometimes we even put a biblical-sounding spin on it and say we don’t want to judge.

Read Paul’s words in verse 3 again, “For I indeed … [I] have already judged … him who has done this deed.” While we cannot know or judge another person’s heart or spiritual relationship with God, we are told throughout Scripture to judge sin. Jesus said, “You will know a tree by its fruit.” That means you must determine what the fruit is!

confronting comfortingThe point we most often miss in all of this is the purpose behind it. It’s not so we can be self-righteous or condemning. It’s so a sinning brother or sister can be reconciled to God. If a person stays in a lifestyle of sin, one of two things is true: either he or she is not really saved or they are in danger of God’s discipline (Heb. 12.5-11).

Later in chapter 11 Paul tells these same believers:

“For this reason many are weak and sick among you, and many sleep. For if we would judge ourselves, we would not be judged. But when we are judged, we are chastened by the Lord, that we may not be condemned with the world.”

Because of unconfessed and unforsaken sin, many were weak and sick and some had even died prematurely!

Certainly we all sin in many ways, and many of those things can be covered in love. But gross sins, life dominating sins like anger, abuse, and sexual immorality should be lovingly confronted in a biblical way. This is not easy to do, but necessary, if the body of Christ is to be the pure and undefiled bride she is called to be.

 

The Danger in NOT Judging Sin - While we cannot know another person’s heart, it is a misunderstanding of the Bible to think we are never to judge someone else's behavior. In fact, there is great danger in not judging sin, especially to the person caught up in it.


Today’s Other Readings:

 

Job 37 & 38:

Things to Consider When Going Through a Test or Trial

 

In chapter 38, God turns the tables on Job and begins to question him! Remember God had already vindicated Job in the court of heaven and He will vindicate him again as He speaks to Job and his friends, but as John MacArthur says in his Daily Bible notes, “… He first brought Job to a right understanding of Himself.”

It’s alright for us to question God, but we must know in advance, we won’t always get an answer, neither will we always understand the answers we get, and we need to be willing to accept that He knows best. Tests and trials are opportunities to trust God in a greater way whether or not it makes sense to us.  Continue reading

Handling Tests & Trials Biblically 2: Coming Forth as Gold + LINKUP

 

Handling Tests & Trials: Coming Forth as Gold - It's been said that either you have just come out of a trial, are presently in a trial, or are about to go through one. Trials expose our hearts. They remove the dross from our lives–those things which keep us from bringing glory to God as we should. But there are things we need to understand about trials and our responses.It’s been said that either you have just come out of a trial, are presently in a trial, or are about to go through one. Trials expose our hearts. They remove the dross from our lives–those things which keep us from bringing glory to God as we should. But there are things we need to understand about trials and our responses.

 

Welcome to Mondays @ Soul Survival.

 

Handling Tests & Trials Biblically: Coming Forth as Gold

 

We’re in a series on “Handling Emotions Biblically.” In earlier posts we covered anger, depression, fear, worry, and guilt. If you missed any of them, just click on the link. You’ll find them all there.

Last week we talked about how God uses tests, trials, and suffering in our lives as a divine squeeze to let us and others see what’s in our hearts. We looked at biblical and unbiblical perspectives on tests and trials and God’s purposes in them. I hope you’ll take the time to read it if you haven’t, especially, if you’re going through a challenging time.

Today we’ll talk about our responses to tests and trials, how we can please Him during those difficult times, how we become like Christ as a result, and the resources God has given us.

 

Coming Forth as Gold

 

Nothing exposes our hearts as much as trials do. When trouble hits us, it’s easy to see the areas where we’re not fully committed to and trusting in God. But God doesn’t allow tests and trials to trip us up or so He can point His finger at us. God allows, even designs, trials to strengthen and purify us. Job said, “When He has tried me, I shall come forth as gold” (Job 23:10, NASB).

But, as I pointed out last week, we sometimes have unbiblical perspectives regarding trials and suffering. We can believe:

  1. That they’re always our fault.
  2. That they’re always the other person’s fault. We can have a “victim” mentality.
  3. That they’re no one’s fault. This is divine fatalism.
  4. That they’re God’s fault. He causes everything, even sin.
  5. Or the Deistic view—that God isn’t involved in it at all. This is the belief that God created everything, but now He just stands back and watches without getting involved.

Then we looked at some biblical perspectives on trials and suffering:

  1. That they’re ultimately the result of the Adam’s fall (Gen 3).
  2. That God is the remote cause. In other words, He allows them, but He’s never the cause of our sin.
  3. That God is sovereign and He works all things according to His plan and purpose, including trials and suffering.
  4. That they’re always for God’s glory and our eternal good, even though God may temporarily set aside our happiness to accomplish something greater.

So, since God has allowed whatever we’re experiencing and it’s for our good, how should we respond?

 

Responding to Tests & Trials

 

It’s important to understand that we’re accountable for our responses no matter how we feel. We’re to respond in ways that please God. That should be our goal in life no matter what our circumstances.

Therefore we make it our aim, whether present or absent, to be well pleasing to Him. 10 For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ, that each one may receive the things done in the body, according to what he has done, whether good or bad (2 Cor 5.9-10).

While it may be easy to justify wrong responses, God gives us the grace  to respond rightly.

No temptation has overtaken you except such as is common to man; but God is faithful, who will not allow you to be tempted beyond what you are able, but with the temptation will also make the way of escape, that you may be able to bear it (1 Cor. 10.13).

We shouldn’t pray to just “hang in there” or somehow get through trials and suffering. We should ask God to help us grow in the midst of the difficulty and to become more like Christ (Rom 8.28-29; Jas 1.2-4).

2 My brethren, count it all joy when you fall into various trials, 3 knowing that the testing of your faith produces patience. 4 But let patience have its perfect work, that you may be perfect and complete, lacking nothing (Jas 1.2-4).

While we may not always rejoice in the suffering itself, we can rejoice in the fact that a sovereign God can work through the trial.

Most of us can look back and see how God has used other trials for our good and how we’ve grown in our faith and trust in Him, not in spite of trials, but because of them.

So, what are some of the specific reasons God allows trials and sufferings?

 

Handling Tests & Trials Biblically: Coming Forth as Gold -


Some of the “Why’s”

 

While we need to be careful of demanding to know “why,” there are some why’s God has revealed in His Word.

  1. Because of unconfessed sin (1 Cor. 11.30; 2 Kings 5.15-27).

In talking about the Lord’s supper in 1 Corinthians 11, Paul said:

28 But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of the bread and drink of the cup. 29 For he who eats and drinks in an unworthy manner eats and drinks judgment to himself, not discerning the Lord’s body. 30 For this reason many are weak and sick among you, and many sleep. 31 For if we would judge ourselves, we would not be judged. 32 But when we are judged, we are chastened by the Lord, that we may not be condemned with the world.

30 For this reason many are weak and sick among you, and many sleep.

The Lord’s supper is a time to remember what Christ did and a reminder of the importance of examining ourselves, but self-examination is something we should do on a regular basis.

Because the people had failed to do so and to confess and forsake sin, many were sick, some had died, and some were “weak.”  That word weak means, “having a propensity for sickness.” We might say “sickly.”

Of course, we need to use caution when viewing the suffering of others. We can’t assume they are guilty of sin. That was the problem with Job’s counselorsContinue reading

“Why me? Why now? Why my family?” August 11

 

Why Me? Why Now? Why My Family? -

 

“Why me?” It’s a question that is often on our lips. Why is this happening? Why me? Why now? Why my kids, my family, my job, my health? But … are we asking the right questions?

 

Today’s Readings:
Job 13 & 14
Psalm 94.12-19
Proverbs 22.26-27
Romans 11.1-18

 

Why me? Why now? Why my family?

 

Job 13 & 14:

Demanding Answers

 

In chapter 13, after strongly rebuking his friends, Job turns his attention directly to God. He is at a loss to understand why all this calamity has come on him. In chapter 14 he talks to God about the frailness of humanity and seems to prepare himself to die, perhaps even yearning for it.

Be sure to read MacArthur’s notes for today’s readings. He jumps ahead to some of the later chapters as he explains that Job’s problem was not the belief that he was righteous, as his friends thought, but his over-familiarity in demanding an answer to why he was suffering such hardship.

We, too, can be tempted to demand answers to our “whys.” While I don’t believe God is put-off by sincere questions from his hurting children, we need to remember that He is God and we are not! Isaiah 55.8-9:

“For My thoughts are not your thoughts,
Nor are your ways My ways,” says the Lord.
“For as the heavens are higher than the earth,
So are My ways higher than your ways,
And My thoughts than your thoughts.

In chapter 40 we will see Job’s reaction after God responded to all his why’s. He said, “I lay my hand over my mouth” (Job 40.4).

So what should we ask when going through a test or trial?  Continue reading